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Author Topic: WHAT HAPPENED TODAY IN THE VIETNAM WAR  (Read 57290 times)
AzPatriot
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« Reply #30 on: October 19, 2010, 06:52:56 PM »

Oct 19, 1965: Communists attack Plei Me Special Forces camp

North Vietnamese troops launch a major assault on U.S. and South Vietnamese Special Forces Camp at Plei Me in the Central Highlands, 215 miles north of Saigon.

During a week of savage fighting, defenders of the besieged outpost, manned by 12 U.S. Green Berets, 400 Montagnard tribesmen, and a handful of South Vietnamese guerrilla specialists, repelled repeated Viet Cong attacks. The tide of the battle turned finally with the arrival of several hundred South Vietnamese reinforcements and numerous Allied air strikes. With the camp secured, General William Westmoreland, senior U.S. military commander in Saigon, decided to seize the advantage and send in the 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) to "find, fix, and defeat the enemy forces" that had threatened Plei Me. This decision would result in November in the battle of the Ia Drang Valley, the war's bloodiest battle to date.

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AzPatriot
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« Reply #31 on: October 20, 2010, 07:43:45 PM »

Oct 20, 1964:Relations between South Vietnam, the United States, and Cambodia deteriorate


A series of incidents and charges bring relations between Cambodia, South Vietnam, and the United States to a low point. Cambodia under Prince Norodom Sihanouk had tried to maintain its neutrality in the growing conflict between Saigon and the Communists in Vietnam, but the country became a sanctuary for Viet Cong and North Vietnamese forces fighting the Saigon government. Sihanouk, not strong enough to prevent the Communists from using his territory, came under increasing political and military pressure from the United States and South Vietnam.

In this incident, South Vietnamese planes strafed a Cambodian village; when Cambodia protested, Saigon replied by reiterating its accusation that Cambodia was providing refuge for Viet Cong forces that were attacking across the border into South Vietnam. On October 22, the United States charged that Cambodian troops crossed over into South Vietnam and seized an U.S. officer advising South Vietnamese forces. On October 25, the officer's body was recovered just inside South Vietnam, and Cambodia was accused of placing the body there to allow the rescue force to be fired on. The next day, Cambodians shot down a U.S. Air Force C-123 cargo plane, loaded with ammunition for a Special Forces camp; eight U.S. servicemen aboard were killed. By October 28, the United States admitted that the plane had strayed over Cambodian territory by mistake, but argued that such incidents arose because of the poorly defined border and the activities of the Viet Cong in the area.

Despite the charges and threats from Prince Sihanouk and U.S. losses in personnel and planes, neither side pursued the matter. However, the use of Cambodia as a sanctuary by the Communists remained a contentious issue; in 1970, President Richard Nixon ordered U.S. and South Vietnamese forces to attack the sanctuaries in what became known as the Cambodian Incursion.  Mini Blast'em!

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« Reply #32 on: October 21, 2010, 03:35:00 PM »

 October 21, 1970

    * In combat centered around the district town of Thuong Duc and the nearby Special Forces camp, 40 km southwest of Da Nang, the Allied command reports killing 163 enemy and capturing 20 in two days of fighting.
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AzPatriot
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« Reply #33 on: October 21, 2010, 07:59:15 PM »

Oct 21, 1967: 100,000 people march on the Pentagon

Demonstrators including radicals, liberals, black nationalists, hippies, professors, women's groups, and war veterans march on the Pentagon.

The rally in front of the Lincoln Memorial started peacefully, though Dr. Benjamin Spock—baby specialist, author, and outspoken critic of the war—did call President Johnson "the enemy." After the rally, the demonstrators, many waving the red, blue, and gold flag of the Viet Cong, began marching toward the Pentagon. Violence erupted when the more radical element of the demonstrators clashed with the soldiers and U.S. Marshals protecting the Pentagon.

The protesters surrounded and besieged the military nerve center until the early hours of October 23. By the time order was restored, 683 people, including novelist Norman Mailer and two United Press International reporters, had been arrested. This protest was paralleled by demonstrations in Japan and Western Europe, the most violent of which occurred outside the U.S. Embassy in London when 3,000 demonstrators attempted to storm the building.

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Dill The Dog
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« Reply #34 on: February 20, 2011, 06:27:36 AM »

RR, question, are there any sites that you know of that have taped original broadcasting from Vietnam,
I was just wondering if Nix has considered a collation of some and then a link from the main page to edited
original battle info of the day I know that trying to do it for the actual day would  be almost impossible
but 500 or so samples on a random loop for different topics might an idea ?


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AzPatriot
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« Reply #35 on: February 21, 2011, 12:37:51 AM »

Feb 20, 1968:
Hearings begin on American policy in Vietnam


The U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee begins hearings to investigate American policy in Vietnam. This was a direct result of the Tet Offensive, in which Viet Cong forces, supported by large numbers of North Vietnamese troops, launched the largest and best-coordinated offensive of the war. During the attack, the Viet Cong drove into the center of South Vietnam's seven largest cities and attacked 30 provincial capitals ranging from the Delta to the DMZ.

Efforts to assess the offensive's impact began well before the fighting officially ended. Militarily, Tet was decidedly an Allied victory, but psychologically and politically, it was a disaster. The offensive had indeed been a crushing military defeat for the Viet Cong and the North Vietnamese, but the size and scope of the communist attacks had caught the American and South Vietnamese allies completely by surprise. The early reporting of a smashing communist victory went largely uncorrected in the media and led to a psychological victory for the communists. The heavy U.S. and South Vietnamese casualties incurred during the offensive, coupled with the disillusionment over the earlier overly optimistic reports of progress in the war, accelerated the growing disenchantment with President Johnson's conduct of the war. This disenchantment caused congressional opponents to call for hearings.

Early sessions in the congressional hearings focused on the 1964 Gulf of Tonkin incident, which had led to the passage of the Tonkin Gulf Resolution, the legal basis for Johnson's escalation of the war. Senators William Fulbright (D-Arkansas) and Wayne Morse (D-Oregon) charged that the Defense Department had withheld information on U.S. naval activities in the Gulf that provoked North Vietnam, leading to the charge of a "credibility gap." At issue was whether the administration had provided Congress with truthful data at the time it was seeking passage of the Tonkin Gulf Resolution in August 1964, which had considerably broadened the president's war-making authority in Southeast Asia. There was no firm resolution of the charges, but the debate reached a new intensity when the New York Times reported that General William Westmoreland, U.S. commander in Saigon, had requested another 206,000 troops. The possibility of another major troop increase provoked a stormy reaction in Congress--both Democrats and Republicans demanded an explanation and insisted that Congress share in any decision to expand the war. In March, 139 members of the House of Representatives sponsored a resolution calling for a full review of American policy in Vietnam.

Eventually the Tet Offensive and the subsequent congressional reaction helped convince Johnson, who was frustrated with his inability to reach a solution in Vietnam, to announce that he would neither seek nor accept the nomination of his party for president.
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AzPatriot
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« Reply #36 on: February 21, 2011, 12:42:19 AM »

 Feb 21, 1967: Bernard Fall killed by mine in South Vietnam

Writer and historian Bernard B. Fall is killed by a Viet Cong mine while accompanying a U.S. Marine patrol along the seacoast about 14 miles northwest of Hue, on a road known as the "Street Without Joy" (which Fall had used for the title of one of his books about the war). A professor of international relations at Howard University in Washington, D.C., Fall was a French citizen and noted expert on the war in Vietnam. He was killed while gathering material for his eighth book. A U.S. Marine photographer was also killed.

Feb 21, 1970:
Kissinger begins secret negotiations with North Vietnamese

National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger begins secret peace talks with North Vietnamese representative Le Duc Tho, the fifth-ranking member of the Hanoi Politburo, at a villa outside Paris.

Le Duc Tho stated that the North Vietnamese position continued to require an unconditional U.S. withdrawal on a fixed date and the abandonment of the Thieu government as a precondition for further progress, which stalled the negotiations. The North Vietnamese rejected Kissinger's proposals for a mutual withdrawal of military forces, the neutralization of Cambodia, and a mixed electoral commission to supervise elections in South Vietnam. The other two meetings, in which there was a similar lack of progress, were held on March 16 and April 4.


Feb 21, 1972:
Nixon visits China


President Richard Nixon visits the People's Republic of China. After arriving in Beijing, the president announced that his breakthrough visit to China is "The week that changed the world." In meeting with Nixon, Prime Minister Zhou Enlai urged early peace in Vietnam, but did not endorse North Vietnam's political demands. North Vietnamese officials and peace negotiators took a dim view of Nixon's trip, fearing that China and the United States would make a deal behind their backs. Nixon's promise to reduce the U.S. military presence on Taiwan seemed to confirm North Vietnam's fears of a Chinese-American sellout-trading U.S. military reduction in Taiwan for peace in Vietnam. Despite Hanoi's fears, China continued to supply North Vietnam levels of aid that had increased significantly in late 1971. This aid permitted the North Vietnamese to launch a major new offensive in March 1972.


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AzPatriot
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« Reply #37 on: February 21, 2011, 12:45:46 AM »

Nixon always gives me a smile "Mai Li" holds him in reverence like most in China, many a statue of him can be found in Guangzhou, another interesting one was a statue of Thomas Jefferson, seems Mr. Sun Yat Sen (who was educated here in the states) and most consider one of the early founders of the revolution really was hip on some of our liberties, amazing to see those 100 year old statues next to the Pizza Hut's and KFC's.
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« Reply #38 on: February 21, 2011, 10:44:03 AM »

Nixon always gives me a smile "Mai Li" holds him in reverence like most in China, many a statue of him can be found in Guangzhou, another interesting one was a statue of Thomas Jefferson, seems Mr. Sun Yat Sen (who was educated here in the states) and most consider one of the early founders of the revolution really was hip on some of our liberties, amazing to see those 100 year old statues next to the Pizza Hut's and KFC's.
Now THAT is an interesting cross-cultural tidbit.  Thanks, AZ!

-- RR
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SP4, 98C20 (Radio Traffic Analyst)
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« Reply #39 on: February 21, 2011, 11:14:21 AM »

RR, question, are there any sites that you know of that have taped original broadcasting from Vietnam,
I was just wondering if Nix has considered a collation of some and then a link from the main page to edited
original battle info of the day I know that trying to do it for the actual day would  be almost impossible
but 500 or so samples on a random loop for different topics might an idea ?


Dill The Dog
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Dill --

I'm not sure what you mean by by "taped original broadcasting".  If you mean AFVN tapes, Nix already has access to a number of those from various sources (including Chris Noel programming  Wink), although there are relatively few newscasts.  However, I don't believe a complete library exists anywhere - although a fair amount of sound is available from AFRTS Archive

If you mean commercial broadcasts, those are all copyrighted and not available except at a very high price (mostly to other media).

If you mean battlefield radio transmissions, they are very few and far between and mostly unintelligible, to the untrained ear.

-- RR
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« Reply #40 on: February 21, 2011, 05:06:24 PM »

Hi RR, yeah did some research already and found what you point out, just thought that i was maybe
missing some other source, all i was wondering was if it would be a worth while add on to the home page with
some links to in house sourced material, purchased or not,  that would give some sense of feel for what was happening
you know the adds and military type broadcast to the troops and some real time live action, it would we nice, rather than
perhaps links taking you to another web site, ...just a thought that was all...i am sure you guys have had these ideas and
the logistics involved outweigh what is involved......but maybe still food for thought...rather than just a gallery.

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AzPatriot
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« Reply #41 on: February 21, 2011, 08:48:16 PM »

 Feb 22, 1965: Westmoreland asks for Marines


General William Westmoreland, commander of Military Assistance Command Vietnam, cables Washington, D.C., to request that two battalions of U.S. Marines be sent to protect the U.S. airbase at Da Nang.

Ambassador Maxwell Taylor, aware of Westmoreland's plan, disagreed and cabled President Lyndon B. Johnson from Saigon to warn that such a step would encourage South Vietnam to "shuck off greater responsibilities." The Joint Chiefs of Staff, however, supported Westmoreland's request and on February 26, White House officials cabled Taylor and Westmoreland that the troops would be sent, and that Taylor should "Secure GVN [Government of South Vietnam] approval." General Westmoreland later insisted that he did not regard his request as "the first step in a growing American commitment," but by 1969 there were over 540,000 American troops in South Vietnam.


Feb 22, 1967:
Operation Junction City begins

Operation Junction City is launched to ease pressure on Saigon. It was an effort to smash the Viet Cong's stronghold in Tay Ninh Province and surrounding areas along the Cambodian border northwest of Saigon.

The purpose of the operation was to drive the Viet Cong away from populated areas and into the open, where superior American firepower could be more effectively used. In the largest operation of the war to date, four South Vietnamese and 22 U.S. battalions were involved--more than 25,000 troops. The first day's operation was supported by 575 aircraft sorties, a record number for a single day in South Vietnam. The operation was marked by one of the largest airmobile assaults in history when 240 troop-carrying helicopters descended on the battlefield. There were 2,728 enemy casualties by the end of the operation on March 17.
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AzPatriot
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« Reply #42 on: February 22, 2011, 10:20:53 PM »

Feb 23, 1966:
Desertion up in South Vietnamese army


According to the U.S. military headquarters in Saigon, 90,000 South Vietnamese deserted in 1965. This number was almost 14 percent of total South Vietnamese army strength and was twice the number of those that deserted in 1964. By contrast, the best estimates showed that fewer than 20,000 Viet Cong defected during the previous year




Feb 23, 1971:
South Vietnamese advance stalls

In Operation Lam Son 719, the South Vietnamese advance into Laos grinds to a halt.

The operation began on February 8. It included a limited incursion by South Vietnamese forces into Laos to disrupt the communist supply and infiltration network in Laos along Route 9 adjacent to the two northern provinces of South Vietnam. The operation was supported by U.S. airpower (aviation and airlift) and artillery (firing across the border from firebases inside South Vietnam).

Observers described the drive on Hanoi's supply routes and depots as some of the "bloodiest fighting" of the war. Enemy resistance was initially light as a 12,000-man spearhead of the South Vietnamese army thrust its way across the border into the communists' deepest jungle stronghold, with the town of Tchepone, a major enemy supply center on Route 9 in Laos, as the major objective. However, resistance stiffened in the second week as the North Vietnamese rushed reinforcements to the area. On this day, the big push bogged down around 16 miles from the border, after bloody fighting in which the communist troops overran two South Vietnamese battalions

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AzPatriot
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« Reply #43 on: February 23, 2011, 10:12:23 PM »

Feb 24, 1968:
Hue recaptured

The Imperial Palace in Hue is recaptured by South Vietnamese troops. Although the Battle of Hue was not officially declared over for another week, it was the last major engagement of the Tet Offensive.

At dawn on the first day of the Tet holiday truce, Viet Cong forces, supported by large numbers of North Vietnamese troops, launched the largest and best-coordinated offensive of the war, driving into the center of South Vietnam's seven largest cities and attacking 30 provincial capitals ranging from the Delta to the DMZ. Among the cities taken during the first four days of the offensive were Hue, Dalat, Kontum, and Quang Tri; in the north, all five provincial capitals were overrun. At the same time, enemy forces shelled numerous allied airfields and bases.

Nearly 1,000 Viet Cong were believed to have infiltrated Saigon, and it required a week of intense fighting by an estimated 11,000 U.S. and South Vietnamese troops to dislodge them. By February 10, the offensive was largely crushed, but with heavy casualties on both sides. The former Imperial capital of Hue took almost a month of savage house-to-house combat to regain. The city had come under attack by two North Vietnamese regiments on January 31 and eventually elements of three North Vietnamese divisions were involved in the fight. The main battle centered on the Citadel, a two-square mile fortress with walls 30 feet high and 20 feet thick built in 1802. It took eight battalions of U.S. Marines and troopers from the 1st Cavalry Division plus eleven South Vietnamese battalions to evict the communists from the city. It was a costly battle. The U.S. Army suffered 74 dead and 507 wounded; the U.S. Marines lost 142 dead and 857 wounded. South Vietnamese losses totaled 384 dead and 1,830 wounded. North Vietnamese casualties included 5,000 dead and countless more wounded.


Nasty battle, this one is the one that always hit's home with me...1/1 Task Force X  Go Marines!

http://ehistory.osu.edu/vietnam/books/1968/0164.cfm
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AzPatriot
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« Reply #44 on: February 24, 2011, 07:47:16 PM »

Feb 25, 1971:
Congress moves to block widening of the war


In both houses of Congress, legislation is initiated to forbid U.S. military support of any South Vietnamese invasion of North Vietnam without congressional approval. This legislation was a result of the controversy that arose after the invasion of Laos by South Vietnamese forces in Operation Lam Son 719. On February 8, South Vietnamese forces had launched a major cross-border operation into Laos to interdict the Ho Chi Minh Trail and destroy the North Vietnamese supply dumps in the area.

Although the only direct U.S. support permitted was long-range cross-border artillery fire from firebases in South Vietnam, fixed-wind air strikes, and 2,600 helicopters to airlift Saigon troops and supplies, President Richard Nixon's critics condemned the invasion. Foreign Relations Committee chairman Senator J. William Fulbright (D-Arkansas) declared the Laotian invasion illegal under the terms of the repeal of the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, which allowed the president only the mandate to end the war.
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