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Author Topic: WHAT HAPPENED TODAY IN THE VIETNAM WAR  (Read 57288 times)
Huyen
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« Reply #15 on: October 07, 2010, 12:35:46 AM »

 October 6, 1970

    * An element of the 198th Infantry Brigade, AMERICAL Division, discovers a 15-ton rice cache 10 km northwest of Quang Ngai City.

    * Intensified Communists shelling continue for a third consecutive day, most of them in the coastal provinces of central South Vietnam. 7 civilians are killed and 52 wounded at the Phy Mu resettlement center, Binh Dinh Province.

    * RVNAF headquarters in Saigon announces the end of a three-month operation in southeastern Cambodia and the withdrawal of the task forces involved. Results are 453 enemy killed, 93 ARVN KIA and 642 ARVN WIA.
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AzPatriot
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« Reply #16 on: October 07, 2010, 03:42:52 PM »

 Oct 7, 1969: Wheeler announces progress in the Vietnamization effort

At his departure from Saigon following a four-day inspection of South Vietnam, General Earle Wheeler, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, reports that "progress in Vietnamization is being steadily and realistically achieved," but that U.S. forces will have to assist the South Vietnamese "for some time to come."

President Nixon had announced his intention to "Vietnamize" the war at the Midway Conference in June, saying that it was time that the South Vietnamese assumed more responsibility for the war. Accordingly, he announced that as the South Vietnamese improved in combat capability, U.S. forces would be withdrawn and returned to the United States. Supposedly, these withdrawals would be predicated on the rate of improvement in the South Vietnamese armed forces and the level of combat on the battlefield. However, once the U.S. troop withdrawals began in the fall of 1969, the schedule achieved a life of its own and the subsequent increments were withdrawn with very little consideration of the original criteria. By January 1972, less than 75,000 U.S. troops remained in South Vietnam


Oct 7, 1970: Nixon announces a new peace proposal


In a televised speech, President Richard Nixon announces a five-point proposal to end the war, based on a "standstill" cease-fire in place in South Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. He proposed eventual withdrawal of U.S. forces, unconditional release of prisoners of war, and political solutions reflecting the will of the South Vietnamese people. Nixon said that the Communist proposals for the ouster of Nguyen Van Thieu, Nguyen Cao Ky, and Tran Thiem Van Thieu were "totally unacceptable" and rejected them. These proposals were well received at home, but were rejected by the Communists a few days later.
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Huyen
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« Reply #17 on: October 07, 2010, 07:35:04 PM »

 October 7, 1970

    * At 1300, a reconnaissance element of the 101st Airborne Division spotted an enemy squad 20 miles south-southeast of Hue in Thua Thien Province. Tactical air strikes were called in. Result was 11 enemy KBA.

    * President Nixon offers new five-point peace plan for Indochina in an address to the nation.

    * COMUSMACV announces C-Day, the day for conversion to Series 692 Military Payment Certificates. This is the first conversion since 11 Aug 69.
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AzPatriot
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« Reply #18 on: October 08, 2010, 02:23:32 PM »

 Oct 8, 1968: U.S. and South Vietnamese navies commence Operation Sealords

 Operation Sealords is launched in the Mekong Delta by U.S. and South Vietnamese forces.

This operation was ordered by newly appointed Commander Naval Forces Vietnam, Vice-Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr., who established Task Force 194 to operate along the canals and less-traveled waterways of the Mekong Delta to interdict Viet Cong infiltration routes from Cambodia. Additionally, TF 194 was to harass Communist forces in the area and, with the assistance of ground and air forces, pacify the Delta region. Under Zumwalt's direction, U.S. and South Vietnamese naval forces worked together to secure the waterways of the Mekong Delta. When the Vietnamization program began in 1969, the U.S. Navy instituted ACTOV (Accelerated Turnover to Vietnam), the Navy's Vietnamization plan, and by April 1971, all Sealords operations had been turned over to the South Vietnamese Navy


Oct 8, 1970:
Communists reject Nixon's peace proposal


The Communist delegation in Paris rejects President Richard Nixon's October 7 proposal as "a maneuver to deceive world opinion." Nixon had announced five-point proposal to end the war, based on a "standstill" cease-fire in place in South Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. He proposed eventual withdrawal of U.S. forces, unconditional release of prisoners of war, and political solutions reflecting the will of the South Vietnamese people. The U.S. Senate had adopted a resolution expressing support for President Nixon's initiative, calling the proposals "fair and equitable," and there was hope that the Communists would respond accordingly. However, the North Vietnamese and Viet Cong negotiators refused to even consider Nixon's proposal, reiterating their previous and long-standing demand for an unconditional and total withdrawal of U.S. forces from Indochina and the overthrow of the "puppet" leaders in Saigon. U.S. officials publicly urged the Soviet Union to use its "considerable influence" with the Communists to persuade them to accept President Nixon's new proposals, but the North Vietnamese stood their ground.


Oct 8, 1972:
Possible breakthrough at Paris peace talks

Rumors arise that there is a breakthrough in the secret talks that had been going on in a villa outside Paris since August 1969. Henry Kissinger, President Richard Nixon's national security advisor, and North Vietnamese negotiators conducted the peace talks. Le Duc Tho, who had taken over as chief negotiator for Hanoi from Xuan Thuy, presented a draft peace agreement proposing that two separate administrations remain in South Vietnam to negotiate general elections. This proposal accepted in substance earlier U.S. terms, and by doing so dropped previous Communist demands for a political solution to accompany a military one.

Tho, believing that the Americans were eager for peace in Vietnam before the elections, proposed that the United States and North Vietnam arrange a cease-fire, governing all military matters between themselves. The proposal also suggested leaving the political questions to be settled by the Vietnamese sides, who would be governed by a "National Council of Reconciliation" until a final settlement could be reached. Hanoi and Saigon would continue to occupy the territory each presently held until then. Kissinger, who considered Hanoi's offer a breakthrough, cabled South Vietnamese President Nguyen Van Thieu "to seize as much territory as possible." In light of this new development in Paris, President Nixon ordered the commencement of Operation Enhance Plus, a program designed to provide South Vietnam with $2 billion worth of military equipment to replace what was lost during the heavy fighting of the 1972 North Vietnamese Easter Offensive
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« Reply #19 on: October 09, 2010, 10:28:52 PM »

 Oct 9, 1969: The National Guard breaks up protests at home

In the United States, the National Guard is called in as demonstrations continue in Chicago protesting the trial of the "Chicago Eight."

The trial had begun on September 24 and involved charges against David Dellinger, Rennie Davis, Thomas Hayden, Abbie Hoffman, Jerry Rubin, Lee Weiner, John Froines, and Bobby Seale for conspiracy to cross state lines with intent to cause a riot. These charges stemmed from the violent antiwar demonstrations in Chicago during the 1968 Democratic National Convention.

When the trial finally ended in February 1970, Judge Julius Hoffman found the seven defendants (Seale had been separated from the others for a separate trial due to his courtroom antics) and their lawyers guilty of 175 counts of contempt and sentenced them to terms of two to four years. Although the jury found the defendants not guilty on the conspiracy charge, the jury did find all except Froines and Weiner guilty of intent to riot. Those found guilty were sentenced to five years and a $5,000 fine, but none served time. In 1972, a Court of Appeals overturned the criminal convictions and eventually most of the contempt charges were also dismissed.

Laird describes new orders to U.S. commanders in Vietnam U.S. Secretary of Defense Melvin Laird, reporting on Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Earle Wheeler's trip to Vietnam at a news conference in Washington, announces that U.S. commanders in Vietnam have been given new orders aimed at placing the "highest priority" on shifting the burden of the fighting to the South Vietnamese forces.

Laird described the new tactics as "protective reaction," but said that the new orders did not forbid U.S. commanders from seeking out and attacking enemy troops that posed threats. This was all part of the Vietnamization program announced by President Richard Nixon at the Midway Conference with South Vietnamese President Nguyen Van Thieu in June.
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« Reply #20 on: October 10, 2010, 08:24:02 PM »

 Oct 10, 1965: 1st Cavalry Division commences operations


In the first major operation since arriving the previous month, the U.S. 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) joins with South Vietnamese Marines to strike at 2,000 North Vietnamese troops 25 miles from An Khe in the Central Highlands.

The 1st Cavalry Division was a new kind of division, which was built around the helicopter and the airmobile concept. The division contained 434 helicopters and had the capability to move one-third of its combat power at one time into terrain inaccessible to normal infantry vehicles. During its first major mission, faulty U.S.-South Vietnamese coordination prevented their forces from entrapping the North Vietnamese Army 325th Infantry Division, but they managed to reopen Route 19, between Pleiku and An Khe, the main east-west supply route in the region. During the course of its employment in South Vietnam, the "First Team," as the 1st Cavalry Division came to be known, would prove to be one of the most effective U.S. combat units in the war.



Oct 10, 1969:
U.S. Navy transfers vessels to South Vietnamese

The U.S. Navy transfers 80 river-patrol boats to the South Vietnamese Navy in the largest single transfer of naval equipment since the war began. This was part of the ongoing Vietnamization program, which had been announced by President Richard Nixon at Midway in June. Under this program, the United States sought to turn over responsibility for the fighting to the South Vietnamese so that U.S. troops could be withdrawn from Vietnam. The plan included a massive transfer of equipment and weapons to the South Vietnamese and a stepped-up training program by U.S. advisers designed to prepare the South Vietnamese armed forces to stand alone against their Communist opponents. The transfer of vessels by the U.S. Navy was only part of the effort that also included a modernization of the South Vietnamese Air Force and new tanks, artillery pieces, and other weapons and equipment for the Army of South Vietnam.

Also on this day: South Vietnamese armed forces assume responsibility for the defense of Saigon as the last U.S. combat contingent in the city was moved to an area 20 miles away. As the Vietnamization progressed, more U.S. forces were withdrawn and by January 1972, less than 70,000 American troops were in South Vietnam.




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AzPatriot
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« Reply #21 on: October 11, 2010, 11:42:04 AM »

 Oct 11, 1954: Viet Minh take control in the north


The Viet Minh formally take over Hanoi and control of North Vietnam.

The Vietnam Doc Lap Dong Minh (Vietnam Independence League), or Viet Minh as it would become known to the world, was a Communist front organization founded by Ho Chi Minh in 1941 to organize resistance against French colonial rule and occupying Japanese forces.

With the end of the Japanese occupation in 1945, the French attempted to reimpose colonial rule. The Viet Minh launched a long and bloody guerrilla war against French colonial forces in what came to be known as the First Indochina War. Ultimately, the Viet Minh, under the leadership of General Vo Nguyen Giap, decisively defeated the French at the Battle of Dien Bien Phu in May 1954. On August 1, the armistice ending the war went into effect. The triumphant Viet Minh marched into Hanoi as the French prepared to withdraw their forces.

Under the provisions of the agreement signed at the Geneva Conference in July, Vietnam was to be temporarily split into approximately equal halves. The two halves were to be separated by a Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) running along the 17th parallel. The northern half was to be governed by the Democratic Republic of Vietnam, which had been proclaimed by Ho Chi Minh, and the southern half would be governed by the noncommunist State of Vietnam until 1956, at which time the two zones were to be reunified following internationally supervised elections. Ngo Dinh Diem, who had become premier of the State of Vietnam in June, was a Catholic and staunchly anticommunist. Diem disliked the Geneva Accords and set about to consolidate his power in the south. By the middle of 1955, Diem had effectively gained control of most of South Vietnam, and in July of that year, he declared his refusal to permit the elections called for at Geneva. This announcement led to a stepped-up insurgency in the south and ultimately to the Second Indochina War, when North Vietnamese regular units were committed in the south and U.S. forces arrived. Vietnam was not reunited until April 1975, when North Vietnamese troops captured Saigon.


Oct 11, 1961:
Kennedy ponders the Vietnam situation

At a meeting of the National Security Council, President John F. Kennedy is asked by his advisers to accept "as our real and ultimate objective the defeat of the Vietcong." The Joint Chiefs of Staff estimated that 40,000 U.S. troops could clean up "the Vietcong threat" and another 120,000 could cope with possible North Vietnamese or Chinese Communist intervention. Kennedy wanted to prevent the fall of South Vietnam to the Communist insurgents, but decided to send General Maxwell Taylor to Vietnam to study the situation. Ultimately, Kennedy would send advisers, helicopters, and other military support to South Vietnam to aid President Ngo Dinh Diem in his fight against the Viet Cong
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« Reply #22 on: October 11, 2010, 04:40:20 PM »

 October 11, 1970

    * The 3d Brigade of the 9th Infantry Division departs RVN.

    * At about 1700, a US Army helicopter gunship accidentally delivered twelve 2.75 rockets on friendly positions while supporting elements of the ARVN 36 km southwest of Vi Thanh in Chuong Thien Province. Results were 8 ARVN KIA and 23 ARVN WIA.

    * SECDEF Melvin R. Laird discloses that the number of US forces in RVN has dropped below the 384,000 man ceiling set by President Nixon for 15 Oct.
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AzPatriot
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« Reply #23 on: October 12, 2010, 01:05:35 AM »

Oct 12, 1967: Dean Rusk criticizes Congress while fighting continues in VNM



At a news conference, Secretary of State Dean Rusk makes controversial comments in which he says that congressional proposals for peace initiatives—a bombing halt or limitation, United Nations action, or a new Geneva conference—were futile because of Hanoi's opposition.

Without the pressure of the bombing, he asked, "Where would be the incentive for peace?" He added that the Vietnam War was a test of Asia's ability to withstand the threat of "a billion Chinese...armed with nuclear weapons." Critics claimed that he had invoked the familiar "yellow peril" of Chinese power.


Oct 12, 1972:
Racial violence breaks out aboard U.S. Navy ships

On this day, racial violence flares aboard U.S. Navy ships. Forty six sailors are injured in a race riot involving more than 100 sailors on the aircraft carrier USS Kitty Hawk enroute to her station in the Gulf of Tonkin off Vietnam. The incident broke out when a black sailor was summoned for questioning regarding an altercation that took place during the crew's liberty in Subic Bay (in the Philippines). The sailor refused to make a statement and he and his friends started a brawl that resulted in sixty sailors being injured during the fighting. Eventually 26 men, all black, were charged with assault and rioting and were ordered to appear before a court-martial in San Diego.

Four days later, a group of about 12 black sailors aboard the USS Hassayampa, a fleet oiler docked at Subic Bay, told ship's officers that they would not sail with the ship when the ship put to sea. The group demanded the return of money that allegedly had been stolen from the wallet of one of the group. The ship's leadership failed to act quickly enough to defuse the situation and later that day, a group of seven white sailors were set upon by the group and beaten. It took the arrival of a Marine detachment to restore order. Six black sailors were charged with assault and rioting.

These incidents indicated the depth of the racial problems in the Navy. All of the services had experienced similar problems earlier, but the Navy had lagged behind the others in addressing the issues that contributed to the racial tensions that erupted on the Kitty Hawk and the Hassayampa. Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr., Chief of Naval Operations, instituted new race relations programs and made significant changes to Naval Regulations to address many of the very real issues raised by the black sailors regarding racial injustice in the Navy.



Subic Bay will do it to you everytime  I'll Drink To That!
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AzPatriot
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« Reply #24 on: October 13, 2010, 07:53:32 PM »

Oct 13, 1966: McNamara claims that war is progressing satisfactorily


Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara declares at a news conference in Saigon that he found that military operations have "progressed very satisfactorily since 1965."

McNamara had arrived in Saigon on October 11 for his eighth fact-finding visit to South Vietnam. He conferred with General William Westmoreland, the senior U.S. military commander; Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge; various military leaders; and South Vietnam's Premier Nguyen Cao Ky and President Nguyen Van Thieu. McNamara said he was pleased with the overall progress in South Vietnam, but he later revealed to President Lyndon Johnson in private that he thought progress was "very slow indeed" in the pacification program.

McNamara wrote after the war that he realized early on "the complexity of the situation and the uncertainties of our ability to deal with it by military means." Though he did understand the obstacles, he was dedicated to the U.S. commitment to preventing Communist takeover of South Vietnam. By the end of 1965, however, even McNamara had begun to doubt that a military solution in Southeast Asia could be achieved. Still, as late as July 1967, he told President Johnson that the U.S. and South Vietnamese forces were making headway in the war. Johnson tired of McNamara's vacillation and eventually replaced him with Clark Clifford in February 1968.
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« Reply #25 on: October 14, 2010, 09:52:46 PM »

 Oct 14, 1968: U.S. servicemen sent to Vietnam for second tours

U.S. Defense Department officials announce that the Army and Marines will be sending about 24,000 men back to Vietnam for involuntary second tours because of the length of the war, high turnover of personnel resulting from the one year of duty, and the tight supply of experienced soldiers. This decision had an extremely negative impact on troop morale and the combat readiness of U.S. forces elsewhere in the world as troops were transferred to meet the increased personnel requirements in Vietnam
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« Reply #26 on: October 15, 2010, 04:20:38 PM »

 October 14, 1970

    * At 1030, helicopter gunships from the 12th Combat Aviation Group spotted an undetermined size enemy force 18 km northwest of Can Gio in the Rung Sat Special Zone. The gunships engaged the enemy with organic weapons, killing 6.

    * Hanoi releases statement officially rejecting President Nixon's peace proposal of October 7.
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« Reply #27 on: October 16, 2010, 08:12:13 AM »

 October 16, 1970

    * At 0910, an element of the 45th Engineer Group and an ARVN unit were ambushed while conducting a mine sweeping operation 15 km south-southeast of Quang Tri City. Results were 10 enemy killed, 2 US KIA and 7 US WIA.

    * At about 1800, helicopter scouts from the 1st Cavalry Division observed an enemy bunker complex 40 km northwest of Bao Loc in Lam Dong Province. Air strikes and aerial rockets were employed, killing 14 of the enemy and destroying 10 bunkers.
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AzPatriot
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« Reply #28 on: October 17, 2010, 08:10:27 PM »

 Oct 17, 1966: President Johnson goes to Asia

President Johnson leaves Washington for a 17-day trip to seven Asian and Pacific nations and a conference scheduled in Manila.

En route to Manila, Johnson visited New Zealand and Australia; in Melbourne, antiwar demonstrators heckled him. In Manila, he met with other Allied leaders who had forces in South Vietnam and they pledged to withdraw their troops within six months if North Vietnam "withdraws its forces to the North and ceases infiltration of South Vietnam." A communiqué signed by the seven participants (the Philippines, Australia, New Zealand, South Korea, South Vietnam, Thailand, and the United States) included a four-point "Declaration of Peace" that stressed the need for a "peaceful settlement of the war in Vietnam and for future peace and progress" in the rest of Asia and the Pacific. When the conference concluded on October 26, Johnson flew to South Vietnam for a surprise two-and-a-half hour visit with U.S. troops at Cam Ranh Bay
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AzPatriot
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« Reply #29 on: October 17, 2010, 08:11:53 PM »

 Oct 18, 1955: Emperor Bao Dai attempts to dismiss Diem

A communiquÉ from Emperor Bao Dai's office in Paris announces that he has dismissed Ngo Dinh Diem from the premiership and annulled his powers.

In a message to the Vietnamese people Bao Dai prophetically declared, "police methods and personal dictatorship must be brought to an end, and I can no longer continue to lend my name and my authority to a man who will drag you into ruin, famine and war." Unfortunately, Diem suppressed the message and it was never publicly transmitted to the people.

Bao Dai had appointed Diem prime minister in June 1954, but soon decided that he was the wrong man to lead South Vietnam. However, by late 1955, Diem was firmly entrenched, having retained control of the government through a questionable referendum. Emperor Bao Dai retired and remained in France. From the beginning, Communists and other rivals caused trouble for Diem's regime. His refusal to institute necessary political reforms and the rising unrest among the people, especially the Buddhists, eventually led to a coup in November 1963, in which he and his brother were murdered.

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