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Author Topic: WHAT HAPPENED TODAY IN THE VIETNAM WAR  (Read 58663 times)
AzPatriot
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« on: September 29, 2010, 05:19:25 PM »

Lest we forget going to start a new thread with purely plagiarized material (done legally of coruse  Wink)
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AzPatriot
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« Reply #1 on: September 29, 2010, 05:21:31 PM »

Sep 29, 1965:
Hanoi announces that downed pilots will be treated as war criminals

Hanoi publishes the text of a letter it has written to the Red Cross claiming that since there is no formal state of war, U.S. pilots shot down over the North will not receive the rights of prisoners of war (POWs) and will be treated as war criminals.

The U.S. State Department protested, but this had no impact on the way the American POWs were treated and most suffered extreme torture and other maltreatment while in captivity. The first pilot captured by the North Vietnamese was Navy Lieutenant Everett Alvarez, who was shot down on August 5, 1964. The American POW held longest was Army Special Forces Captain Floyd James Thompson, who had been captured in the South on March 26, 1964. American POWs were held in 11 different prisons in North Vietnam and their treatment by the North Vietnamese was characterized by isolation, torture, and psychological abuse. The exact number of POWs held by the North Vietnamese during the war remains a debatable issue, but the POWs themselves have accounted for at least 766 verified captives at one point. Under the provisions of the Paris Peace Accords, the North Vietnamese released 565 American military and 26 civilian POWs in February and March 1973, but there were still more than 2,500 men listed as Missing in Action (MIA).
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AzPatriot
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« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2010, 12:23:42 AM »

Sep 30, 1964:
First large scale antiwar demonstration staged at Berkeley

The first large-scale antiwar demonstration in the United States is staged at the University of California at Berkeley, by students and faculty opposed to the war. Nevertheless, polls showed that a majority of Americans supported President Lyndon Johnson's policy on the war.

Sep 30, 1968:
Humphrey announces that he would halt the bombing of North Vietnam

Apparently trying to distance himself from Johnson's policies, Democratic presidential candidate Hubert Humphrey announces that, if elected, he would halt the bombing of the North if there was any "evidence, direct or indirect, by deed or word, of communist willingness" to restore the Demilitarized Zone between North and South Vietnam.

Also on this day in Vietnam: The 900th US aircraft is shot down over the North and the USS New Jersey, the world's only active battleship, arrives in Vietnamese waters and begins bombarding the Demilitarized Zone from her station off the Vietnamese coast.
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« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2010, 03:15:51 PM »

Sep 30, 1964:
First large scale antiwar demonstration staged at Berkeley

The first large-scale antiwar demonstration in the United States is staged at the University of California at Berkeley, by students and faculty opposed to the war. Nevertheless, polls showed that a majority of Americans supported President Lyndon Johnson's policy on the war.

Sep 30, 1968:
Humphrey announces that he would halt the bombing of North Vietnam

Apparently trying to distance himself from Johnson's policies, Democratic presidential candidate Hubert Humphrey announces that, if elected, he would halt the bombing of the North if there was any "evidence, direct or indirect, by deed or word, of communist willingness" to restore the Demilitarized Zone between North and South Vietnam.

Also on this day in Vietnam: The 900th US aircraft is shot down over the North and the USS New Jersey, the world's only active battleship, arrives in Vietnamese waters and begins bombarding the Demilitarized Zone from her station off the Vietnamese coast.
Appreciate your enthusiam and sense of involvement here, AZ, and glad to have you with us!  Cheers!

-- RR
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AzPatriot
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« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2010, 11:10:20 PM »

On this day, South Vietnam requests a bilateral defense treaty with the United States. President John F. Kennedy was faced with a serious dilemma in Vietnam. The government of Ngo Dinh Diem in Saigon was increasingly unpopular with the South Vietnamese people because of his refusal to institute political reform and the suppression of opposing political and religious factions. However, Diem was staunchly anticommunist, which made him attractive to the American president, who was concerned about the growing strength of the Communists in Southeast Asia.

The United States had taken over the fight against the Communists in Vietnam from the French, who had been defeated by the Viet Minh at the Battle of Dien Bien Phu in May 1954. The United States had been providing military aid to the South Vietnamese through the French since 1951. In 1955, this aid, which included American military advisers, was provided directly to the Diem government in Saigon. With the formal request for a bilateral defense treaty, the number of U.S. personnel in South Vietnam grew to more than 3,000 by the end of 1961, and the American commitment to Saigon grew steadily over the next two years. When President Kennedy was assassinated in November 1963, there were over 16,000 American personnel in Vietnam. Under Kennedy's successor, Lyndon B. Johnson, this number would grow to more than 500,000.
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« Reply #5 on: October 01, 2010, 10:48:30 AM »

On this day,

    * The 1st ARVN Division begins Operation LAM SON 368 in Quang Tri Province.

    * The 1st ARVN Division begins Operation LAM SON 370 in Thua Thien Province.

    * The 1st ARVN Division begins Operation LAM SON 371 in Thua Thien Province.

    * The 2nd ARVN Division begins Operation QUYET THANG 45C in Quang Ngai Province.

    * The 2nd ARVN Division begins Operation QUYET THANG 54C in Quang Tin Province.

    * The 2nd ARVN Division begins Operation QUYET THANG 63C in Quang Ngai Province.

    * COL Joh W. Betzold, USA, assumes duties of MACV Chaplain, replacing COL William R. Fitzgerald.
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AzPatriot
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« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2010, 01:52:26 AM »

Oct 2, 1967: Aerial offensive against North Vietnam continues


The increased U.S. aerial offensive against North Vietnam that had started August 11 continues. According to U.S. State and Defense officials, the offensive had slowed the flow of war supplies from Communist China to Hanoi. Intelligence overflights revealed that the bombing of bridges had halted the movement of military material on the key rail line from Dong Dang, near the Chinese border, to Hanoi. However, U.S. officials conceded that Communist military equipment was reaching Hanoi by other means.

In Congress, dissention continued over the bombing issue. Senator John Sherman Cooper (R-New York) urged the United States to take the "first step" toward negotiations with an "unconditional cessation" of the bombing of North Vietnam. Senator Gale McGee (D-Wyoming) defended the Vietnam policies of the Johnson administration saying the "stake is not only Vietnam but all the nations in Southeast Asia."



Oct 2, 1966:
Soviets report that Russian military personnel have come under fire

The Soviet Defense Ministry newspaper, Krasnaya Zuezda, reports that Russian military experts have come under fire during U.S. raids against North Vietnamese missile sites while the Soviets were training North Vietnamese soldiers in the use of Soviet-made anti-aircraft missiles.

This was extremely significant because it was the first public acknowledgment that Soviets had trained North Vietnamese missile crews and were observing them in action. U.S. officials had long maintained that the Soviet Union and the People's Republic of China were providing military aid--including training advisers, weapons, and equipment--that permitted the North Vietnamese to continue the war. Until this pooint, both the Soviets and Chinese had denied they had personnel in North Vietnam.

The North Vietnamese fired over 10,000 SA-2 SAMs (surface-to-air missiles) at U.S. aircraft from 1965 to 1972, and each of those missiles was supplied by the Soviet Union. This was also true for the T-54 medium tanks, 130-mm field guns, and other sophisticated weapons and equipment the North Vietnamese used to launch their 1972 and 1975 offensives. The only time that this steady source of weapons and equipment from the Soviets was significantly impeded was during 1972, when President Richard Nixon ordered the stepping up of air raids against Hanoi and the mining of Haiphong harbor, through which most of the weapons and heavy equipment normally came
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« Reply #7 on: October 02, 2010, 07:04:02 AM »

This is something I'd love to figure out how to show yearly on the front page for each day...need to look into that for the updated site.  Jammin' Guitar
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AzPatriot
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« Reply #8 on: October 02, 2010, 12:14:42 PM »

Probably need to see if there is an RSS feed, I get this stuff from History....will do a little searching to see if I can find one.

Update: http://www.vietnam.ttu.edu/followus/#rss might have a feed, there are several others however we will get non-VNM info too and that might take away from content.
« Last Edit: October 02, 2010, 12:27:29 PM by azpatriot » Logged
AzPatriot
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« Reply #9 on: October 03, 2010, 12:13:05 AM »

Oct 3, 1967:
Operation Wallowa commences

Elements of the 1st Cavalry Division launch Operation Wallowa in South Vietnam's northernmost provinces.

A task force was sent in to relieve pressure on the U.S. Marines, who were fighting a heavy series of engagements along the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ). As these operations commenced, U.S. planes raided North Vietnamese supply routes and attacked bridges only 10 miles from the Chinese frontier.


Oct 3, 1968:
Twenty-four die in Army helicopter accident

At Camp Evans, 11 miles north of Hue, 24 U.S. military personnel die when a U.S. Army CH-47 helicopter collides with an American C-7 Caribou transport aircraft. All aboard both aircrafts perished. Meanwhile, U.S. planes severed roads in more than 20 places, destroying over 75 supply vehicles in the heaviest raids over North Vietnam since July 2.
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AzPatriot
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« Reply #10 on: October 03, 2010, 10:36:12 PM »

 Oct 4, 1964

President Johnson issues the order to reactivate North Vietnamese coastal raids by South Vietnamese boats as part of Oplan 34A.

These raids had been suspended after the Gulf of Tonkin incident in early August. On August 2, North Vietnamese patrol boats attacked the destroyer USS Maddox, which was conducting an intelligence gathering mission in the same general area that had just come under attack by several Oplan 34A raids. Two days after the first attack, there was another incident, the details of which remain unclear. The Maddox, joined by destroyer USS C. Turner Joy, engaged what were, at the time, believed to be more attacking North Vietnamese patrol boats.

Although it was questionable whether the second attack actually happened, the incident provided the rationale for retaliatory air attacks against the North Vietnamese and the subsequent Tonkin Gulf Resolution, which became the basis for the initial escalation of the war in Vietnam and ultimately, the insertion of U.S. combat troops into the area. After two months, approval was given to continue the Oplan 34A raids against North Vietnamese coastal installations.




Oct 4, 1966:
Pope calls for end to the Vietnam war.

 Pope Paul VI addresses 150,000 people in St. Peter's Square in Rome and calls for an end to the war in Vietnam through negotiations. Although the Pope's address had no impact on the Johnson administration and its policies in Southeast Asia, his comments were indicative of the mounting antiwar sentiment that was growing both at home and overseas


« Last Edit: October 03, 2010, 10:38:01 PM by azpatriot » Logged
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« Reply #11 on: October 04, 2010, 04:38:38 PM »

The 4th Infantry Division begins Operation WAYNE SABRE to provide security for populated areas around An Khe, Binh Dinh Province.
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AzPatriot
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« Reply #12 on: October 04, 2010, 05:22:19 PM »

Thank's for the extra input Huyen, Saw we were online at same time and about fell out of my chair  Cheers!
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AzPatriot
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« Reply #13 on: October 04, 2010, 11:52:46 PM »

 Oct 5, 1963: South Vietnamese generals plan coup

Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge reports to President John F. Kennedy from Saigon that South Vietnamese generals are planning a coup against President Ngo Dinh Diem.

Kennedy and his administration had become increasingly concerned about Diem because of the rising tide of dissent against the Diem regime in South Vietnam. Diem, a Catholic in a predominantly Buddhist nation, refused to institute promised political reforms. He was opposed by numerous factions, not the least of which were the Buddhist priests. Several South Vietnamese generals led by General Duong Van Minh met with CIA operative Lucien Conein to ask for assurances that the United States would not thwart a coup, and that economic and military aid would continue. Kennedy had already come to the conclusion that Diem could never provide the necessary leadership to unite his country against the Communist insurgents. He told Conein to give the South Vietnamese generals the assurances they wanted. Kennedy also warned that, as a representative of the United States, Conein should avoid getting involved with operational details.

The coup plotters received additional motivation in the wake of another Buddhist monk's self-immolation (on June 11, 1963, Buddhist monk Thich Quang Duc had set fire to himself in protest; his self-immolation was followed by several others) when Diem reacted with intensified political repression, including the arrest of scores of women and children who had marched against the government. Another attempt was made by the Kennedy administration to convince Diem to make the necessary reforms, but once again he refused. There was disagreement among Kennedy's advisors as to what to do about Diem; some believed that Diem had to go and others were unsure. Ultimately the president decided to do nothing. In this case, that was tantamount to support of the coup plotters.

On November 1, rebel forces seized the radio station and police headquarters while laying siege to the presidential palace. In the early morning hours of the next day, Diem and his brother Ngo Dinh Nhu surrendered to representatives from the rebel generals. They were later found murdered in the back of an M-113 armored personnel carrier. What followed was a period of extreme political instability as a series of "revolving door" governments took turns in an attempt to rule and stem the tide of the ongoing insurgency in the countryside.
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AzPatriot
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« Reply #14 on: October 06, 2010, 01:17:23 AM »

Oct 6, 1967: U.S. jets strike targets in North Vietnam

U.S. Navy pilots fly 34 missions as they again strike the Chien Chiang and Lang Son bridges near the Chinese border, another bridge 39 miles northeast of Hanoi, a railroad yard near Mo Trang, and two anti-aircraft sites south of Dong Hoi.

Other jets attacked the Nam Dinh power plant that lay 45 miles southwest of Haiphong; a railway and highway bridge 24 miles southeast of Hanoi; and eight buildings in the Yen Bac military storage area. These raids were all part of Operation Rolling Thunder, which had been initiated in March 1965 and became the longest bombing campaign ever conducted by the United States Air Force. It was designed to destroy North Vietnam's industrial base and war-making capability.

During the protracted campaign, more than 643,000 tons of bombs fell on North Vietnam, destroying 65 percent of North Vietnam's petroleum storage capacity and an estimated 60 percent of its power-generating capability. Despite these results, Rolling Thunder has generally been assessed as a failure. For a number of reasons, conventional airpower used on North Vietnam did not have the desired impact on the unconventional war being fought in South Vietnam. First, North Vietnam was primarily a pre-industrial, agricultural society without major industrial targets. Second, the overall effectiveness of the bombing campaign was hampered by political constraints that limited targeting and other operational planning factors. Third, and perhaps most important, the North Vietnamese were a determined people who were prepared to continue fighting as long as it took to achieve their war aims. In essence, the United States was fighting a limited war, but the North Vietnamese were fighting a total war to the finish.

 Oct 6, 1970:   South Vietnamese forces withdraw from Cambodia


South Vietnamese military officials announce the end of a three-month operation in southeastern Cambodia and the withdrawal of the 12,000-man task force involved. During the operation, which was designed to eliminate Communist base camps and supply areas along the Ho Chi Minh Trail, 453 enemy soldiers were reported killed. South Vietnamese losses were 93 killed and 642 wounded.


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