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Huyen
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« Reply #15 on: October 13, 2007, 02:37:16 AM »

A COUPLE OF SNIPPETS - 1st Platton Leader Delta Co 1/28

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Danger Close – Tree Bursts
Company size operation on a Search and Destroy mission with an attached Artillery FO. Capt Deblois in charge of company so we must have been operating out of Phuoc Vinh. Probably in August of 1967. Don’t remember where or exactly when this operation took place.

Once again my 1st Platoon was running point for the Company and we ran into Charlie at a small arc style bridge about 15 meters long and about 3 or 4 meters wide. The bridge was crossing a canal that was used to flood rice paddies. The point of my Platoon had just crossed over the bridge and started receiving small arms fire. My Platoon’s Point retreated to our “friendly” side of bridge and we all took cover behind the “friendly” berm that contained the canal water. On both sides of the berm there was a medium size growth of weeds, grass, whatever, and palm/coconut trees.

Capt Deblois, the FO, and the rest of the Company were about 100 meters behind my Platoon in a wooded area. I got on the horn and reported the situation to Capt. Deblois and he said the FO would be sending some artillery rounds over my head onto the enemy side of the berm and I was to adjust the rounds. Now the artillery was 5 to 10 miles away and the FO had plotted my position and sent a couple of rounds overhead.

These couple of rounds were a little bit to far away so I adjust to have them dropped a minus 50 meters. My god, either I was off or the FO or Artillery Battery was off (couldn’t believe I was off), the next few rounds dropped about 30 meters in front of my position with a couple of them hitting the top of the trees on the friendly side of the berm. Shrapnel was flying all around my Platoon and we buried ourselves inside our steel pots. I was on the horn yelling “CEASE FIRE, CEASE FIRE”. The FO gets on the horn and wants to know what’s the matter? I told him the chit was dropping on top of us and if he wanted to call anymore in he was to come up to my position and call it in from my location. Needles to say the FO didn’t want to come up to our position; so we didn’t have any more artillery coming in. Nobody hurt, enemy or friendly. Charlie was long gone.

K9 Team
Company size operation on a Search and Destroy mission with an attached K9 Team (German Shepard and HER handler). Capt Deblois in charge of company so we must have been operating out of Phuoc Vinh but at an NDP site away from Phuoc Vinh. Probably in August of 1967. Don’t remember where or exactly when this operation took place, but was to be performed through medium to thick jungle.

Once again my 1st Platoon was running Point for the Company. For some strange reason, in jungle conditions, “country boys” could pull Point a lot better than “city boys”. I normally rotated my Platoon Point between four or five of my best “country boys”. Now the K9 team had been attached to my Platoon so when it was time for me to give my Point a break, I decided to use the K9 team as my next Point rotation to break jungle for us. THE DOG was smarter than most troops – SHE refused to break through the jungle. To no avail, all the azz chewing I did on that handler didn’t budge that dog. Lazy BITCH!

Now come nighttime and we were bedding down for the night, that BITCH and handler had to sleep away from the rest of the troops. Damn dog would attack us if we got to close to their sleeping location.

Don’t get me wrong K9’s worked well in open areas or villages. I was around when a dog and handler took a booby trap explosion, which saved a bunch of GI’s at the cost of the dog and handler’s lives.

===================
Don't really know if you folks want to see stuff like this or not.


KEN
Delta Company "BLACK LIONS" JUL '67 thru FEB '68
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« Reply #16 on: October 13, 2007, 02:38:06 AM »

Sep 3, 1967 Vietnamese Presidential Elections

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From Historical Records and Memory....

Name of Village forgotten. Our unit was operating out of Phuoc Vinh and we were detailed to guard the streets of a small nearby village while the locals went to the voting location to cast their vote. We entered this village on foot right at daybreak. Upon entering the village we seen a couple of dead locals hanged at each end of the two village entrances. We had to lower and cover these bodies.

The number of citizens in this village was small (probably less than 300). Needless to say the voting turnout was sparse. I would estimate between 20 and 30 BRAVE individuals voted that day. After the voting location was closed, we left the village. Don’t know if anything happened to the BRAVE voters after we left.

Historically U.S. Newspapers reported a 83% turn out for this election. Can’t prove it by me.

KEN
1st Platoon Leader, Delta Co. 1/28th
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« Reply #17 on: October 13, 2007, 02:39:24 AM »

Battle of AN MY Feb 1st and 2nd - D Co. 1/28th

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Submitted by Ken 1st Platoon Leader, Delta Co. 1/28th

The following I found on the internet after the email exchange below. This quote is supposed to be a Historical 1st Division write-up (this is an extract of that write-up):


Quote
Quote:
Tet
On 1 February, following the start of the Tet Offensive, C Company, 1-28 made contact outside of the village of An My less than a mile from the north gate of the 1st ID base camp at Phu Loi. C Company, facing strong VC resistance, was reinforced by D Company. Alpha Company would join the battle at noon.

Squad leader Staff Sergeant Bernard Ryan was wounded by an enemy grenade, but continued to fight. He killed an enemy machine gun team, then led a squad to secure a supporting tank that had been hit by an RPG. Staff Sergeant Ryan commandeered the tank and drove it to safety. He would receive an "impact award" Silver Star at the end of the day. The following day he was mortally wounded by a sniper while attempting to destroy a VC bunker. 1-28 ordered to break contact while artillery and air strikes pummeled An My all night.

On 2 February, 1-28, supported by three cavalry platoons swept from south to north on line. 1-28 met light resistance on the left and right, while C Company, in the middle met heavy enemy fire. 1-28 fought house to house in the village, completing its search at 1900. The enemy suffered 372 dead and 12 captured, and lost large quantities of supplies. 1-28 lost eighteen KIA and forty-nine WIA.

After participating in several more operations, 1-28 would finish the year at Fire Base Remagen. ( 


My internet search for troops that were with me in Vietnam so far has turned up one troop that was in Delta Company the same time I was there. He was a Medic (Doc Torres) in a a different platoon than mine. Doc Torres was in Sgt Ryan's platoon. The following is a an extract of an email exchange between DOC Torres and myself regarding the Battle of AN MY:

= = = =
FROM: KEN JENSEN
TO: TOM (Doc TORRES)

Tried to call you on the telephone a couple of times today (Sat). We need to talk - If you want!

My Platoon (1st) seemed to be always selected to pull Point for D Company. Do you remember during Tet in about early Feb '68 we fought in a pretty large village where there was a VC Flag in the center of the Village - we also had some Mec units with us - APC's???

My Platoon went in as point and we fought for about 4 hrs and was running mighty low on ammo. The friggin Capt Carr wouldn't send any other Platoon to help the 1st Platoon out. The dumb **** was keeping three Platoons in reserve while my men had to rob AK's and ammo from the VC to keep on fighting. Later he did use his other Platoons but I was so friggin mad I could have shot Capt Carr. By the way prior to all this you might have heard from my troops he was going to court martial me and that I did threaten to Kill him. That's another story you may remember I could talk about.

Anyway, on the 2nd day in the battle at the Vil. the friggin 1st Sgt was going around counting bodies and getting rich stealing personal items from the dead VC bodies. They had estimated (I heard) we killed over 300 VC and mixed NVA. If you remember this battle would like to chat about it. Need to clear some things up in my mind. Do you remember a Platoon Sgt RYAN?

Sgt RYAN was a good friend of mine in the Nam. He was a Platoon Sgt in a different Platoon than mine. But, he and I would always coordinate and bull **** whenever we could. We had somethings in common - I was an older Lt. (26) and he was in his early 30's. He was from Calif. and so was I. I had 6 1/2 years as an enlisted man that never made it past E4 before I went to OCS. Got busted down in rank at 17yrs old while enlisted. Long story. Anyway he liked me because I wasn't a typical officer.

Sgt RYAN's daughter posted a couple of remarks on THE WALL page for Sgt RYAN. I sent her an email - she contacted me back and wanted to know more about her Dad than what I would/could tell her. She is somewhat disgruntled about current war situation in Iraq and a little anti Gov't because of her Dad's death in a somewhat useless war - so I didn't enjoy talking (emailing) with her.

Anyway I had heard that Sgt RYAN was killed peeping into a spider hole WITHOUT first tossing a grenade in. You had mentioned that he got it in the face almost confirms what I heard. In addition, I had heard that he had received TWO Silver Stars for action during the battle in that Vil. I also heard that he had been teaching and showing the troops how to approach a spider hole by FIRST throwing in a grenade before peeping into the hole AND that he had just screwed up by not using a grenade first. You can't believe how I felt when I heard he was dead. I openly cried for him, at the time, and have shed some tears for him to this day whenever I talk about him (like now).

Shortly after the Vil. battle mentioned above, we were choppered out to defend Ton Son Nut Air Base. We were to go find the enemy before they hit the Air Base and/or Siagon.

= = = =

FROM: tom torres
TO: ken jensen

i think the large village yu ae talking about was the village of 'an my' where c company had inital contact and we came up to see what was going on. needless to say we ran into a buzz saw. we were pushed back to the berm that surounded the village. do you remember when a duster (70 mm trk) took a rpg? it was sgt. ryan and myself that ran to the trk and pulled 3(?) wounded out, all the while the vc were still trying to knock us out with rpg. we could hear them hissing overhead and we got the wounded out and moved to a tree grove about 75 yards back. that is when sgt ryan jumped into the trk and drove out of range (silver star for that ) all the while rpg hissing all over the place. the next day our sgt. ryan took it in the mouth.

let me tell yu about ryan. we had just come back to pho loi from the 1st contact with the vc at an my village. we were back in the compound of the air base (pho loi), me and the sgt. were sitting in our little area and i looked over to ryan while he was writting to his wife and i said, "sgt., you look like you should be sitting in you big easy chair at home, smoking your pipe". he just grinned at me.

the next day during our sweep (the marine tactic we talked about eariler), we got on a scurmish line and began our sweep. the funny thing is about 2 guys in front of us looked in the same hole with incident. when it was my turn to walk past the hole, i too look in and saw nothing but darkness and kept walking. sgt. ryan was right behind me and when he looked in they opened up with a ak. i know they were waiting for someone with rank and since ryan looked older, he was chosen.

when i immediately got to him, i knew he had died, there was no way he could have survived the shots to the head. he was the platoons father and after his death, our platoon literally turned in the killing machine that the army wanted. we now had a real reason to go after the enemy.

his present changed the complex of the our platoon before and after his death. i'll never forget him.


i remember you very well and we got along very well, we both detestd carr. do you remember carr sendihng us out on a patrol with no back-up at all. we walking along a river (saigon) and we saw all kinds of sandals tracks all around us and we called it in,. your were very cool, told to eat our c's right at that location with all the vc watching us from the hedgerows, your logic was to pretned we were bait for them to attack and that they knew we were bait, so they didn't attack. when we called it in carr basically said 'you are on your own'. he was mad at you for calling on him about his marine on line tactics at ‘an my’ and was trying to get you and your platoon killed. i think that was the maddest i've ever been at an officer.

right now my mind is flooding with memories and i have to stop, hope you understand, will talk at ya later

= = = =

FROM: KEN JESEN
TO: DOC TORRES

By the way, after the battle at An My, I took 4 captured AK47's to an Air Cav unit and traded them for 4 M-60's (they happen to have a lot of them for door gunners). Being prior enlisted, I knew how to barter with supply sergeants and I needed more firepower in my Platoon. Capt Carr had a fit - I told him to shove it. Hmmmm another after thought during that battle, one of my men captured a fairly new motor scooter and tagged it as his war booty. We loaded the scooter onto one of the mech Cav APC's for them to haul it out. In order to get it back, after the battle was a done deal, I had to lock and load on the Cav's Company Commander and told him to go and get the friggin scooter.

= = = = = end of email stuff = = = = =

Please go visit any of the many virtual walls and honor Sgt. Bernard Ryan Panel 36E Line 85


KEN
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« Reply #18 on: October 13, 2007, 02:40:35 AM »

SILVER STAR AWARD - 1st Platoon Leader, D Co 1/28th

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Please go to the WALL at following link or to whatever virtual wall you choose to visit and post an HONOR remark for this fine soldier: FREDERICK WILLIAM HAAS; he can be located at Panel 39E Line 47

http://thewall-usa.com/info.asp?recid=20566

As a Platoon Leader I wasn't supposed to get to close to my men. Due to circumstances beyond my control, I got close to my number one M60 machine gunner. This was HAAS (see attachments).

HAAS KIA FEB 15 '67 Tu Doc, Gia Dinh.JPG

PICTURE OF HAAS FROM vvmf.org (Veterans Memorial Fund).jpg

Haas and I were med evaced out on the same chopper. Haas died just as we landed at 24th Med Evac. Due to my effort in trying to save this fine young man, I was awarded the Silver Star. I include a reproduction copy of my Silver Star here as the story on how Haas was killed. Haas took multiple machine gun rounds through the mid section. As most stories coming out of Vietnam they are in error. My award is no different. The date of action on the award states Feb 14 and Haas KIA date is Feb 15th. The text is a little colorful not exactly accurate; but close as to what partially happened.


DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
HEADQUARTERS 1ST INFANTRY DIVISION
APO San Francisco 96345

GENERAL ORDERS 15 MARCH 1968
NUMBER 2268
AWARD OF THE SILVER STAR

1. TC 320. The following AWARD is announced.

JENSEN, KENNETH W. FIRST LIEUTENANT INFANTRY United States Army
Company D First Battalion 28th Infantry
Awarded: Silver Star
Date of Action: 14 February 1968
Theater: Republic of Vietnam
Reason: For gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam:

On this date, Lieutenant Jensen was serving as a platoon leader with his company during a reconnaissance in force operation approximately three kilometers southwest of the village of Thu Duc. As the unit proceeded through an area of rice fields and coconut groves, part of his platoon was forced to take cover from sudden hostile rocket, automatic weapons, and machine gun fire. He immediately moved through the hail of enemy rounds to deploy his remaining squad into advantageous positions from which they brought accurate retaliatory fire upon the insurgents. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Jensen began crawling beneath the hostile fire toward a wounded man on the enemy side of a berm. As he attempted to rescue the individual, he became hit in the chest by enemy fire and was unable to help the man. Lieutenant Jensen then placed rapid and accurate fire on the insurgents from his location while others moved the casualty to relative safety. He was again hit by the intense fire, but refused medical attention until he had led his men in a withdrawal so that artillery fire could be employed. The extraordinary courage and dynamic leadership displayed by Lieutenant Jensen despite his wounds were instrumental in limiting friendly casualties, and significantly contributed toward the defeat of the Viet Cong. First Lieutenant Jensen’s unquestionable valor in close combat against numerical superior hostile forces is in keeping with the finest tradition of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Authority: By direction of the President, as established by the Act of Congress, 9 July 1918 and USARV Message 16695, dated 1 July 1966.

FOR THE COMMANDER:
REPRODUCTION COPY REPRODUCTION
ARCHIE R. HYLE
Colonel, GS
Chief of Staff





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« Reply #19 on: October 13, 2007, 02:41:32 AM »

Part of My TET Adventure (Feb '68) - D Co. 1/28th - 1st Platoon Leader

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Using “the net” I have found one individual that was in my same Company (Delta Co. 1/28th) during some of the same timeframe as I (he was a Medic in another Platoon). Following is a couple of email exchanges between him and me:

================================================== =======================================
TO: TOM (Doc TORRES)

Tried to call you on the telephone a couple of times today (Sat). We need to talk - If you want!

The action date of my Silver Star Award is Feb 14th, 1968. The troop I was attempting to save was HAAS. The Wall list HAAS as KIA on Feb 15th. I have no idea of what is the correct date. I wonder if you could help me out.

My Platoon (1st) seemed to be always selected to pull Point for D Company. Do you remember during Tet in about early Feb '68 we fought in a pretty large village where there was a VC Flag in the center of the Village - we also had some Mec units with us - APC's???

My Platoon went in as point and we fought for about 4 hrs and was running mighty low on ammo. The friggin Capt Carr wouldn't send any other Platoon to help the 1st Platoon out. The dumb **** was keeping three Platoons in reserve while my men had to rob AK's and ammo from the VC to keep on fighting. Later he did use his other Platoons but I was so friggin mad I could have shot Capt Carr. By the way prior to all this you might have heard from my troops he was going to court martial me and that I did threaten to Kill him. That's another story you may remember I could talk about.

Anyway, on the 2nd day in the battle at the Vil. the friggin 1st Sgt was going around counting bodies and getting rich stealing personal items from the dead VC bodies. They had estimated (I heard) we killed over 300 VC and mixed NVA. If you remember this battle would like to chat about it. Need to clear some things up in my mind. Do you remember a Platoon Sgt RYAN?

Sgt RYAN was a good friend of mine in the Nam. He was a Platoon Sgt in a different Platoon than mine. But, he and I would always coordinate and bull **** whenever we could. We had somethings in common - I was an older Lt. (26) and he was in his early 30's. He was from Calif. and so was I. I had 6 1/2 years as an enlisted man that never made it past E4 before I went to OCS. Got busted down in rank at 17yrs old while enlisted. Long story. Anyway he liked me because I wasn't a typical officer.

Sgt RYAN's daughter posted a couple of remarks on THE WALL page for Sgt RYAN. I sent her an email - she contacted me back and wanted to know more about her Dad than what I would/could tell her. She is somewhat disgruntled about current war situation in Iraq and a little anti Gov't because of her Dad's death in a somewhat useless war - so I didn't enjoy talking (emailing) with her.

Anyway I had heard that Sgt RYAN was killed peeping into a spider hole WITHOUT first tossing a grenade in. You had mentioned that he got it in the face almost confirms what I heard. In addition, I had heard that he had received TWO Silver Stars for action during the battle in that Vil. I also heard that he had been teaching and showing the troops how to approach a spider hole by FIRST throwing in a grenade before peeping into the hole AND that he had just screwed up by not using a grenade first. You can't believe how I felt when I heard he was dead. I openly cried for him, at the time, and have shed some tears for him to this day whenever I talk about him (like now).

Shortly after the Vil. battle mentioned above, we were choppered out to defend Ton Son Nut Air Base. We were to go find the enemy before they hit the Air Base and/or Siagon.

Well my Silver Star action was during that battle when my POINT Platoon found the enemy. We hit one mother f.....cking large ambush just before a very large bridge. Man the **** was flying - I had six wounded on the first burst of enemy fire. Do you remember any of this ****?


FROM: tom torres

i think the large village yu ae talking about was the village of 'an my' where c company had inital contact and we came up to see what was going on. needless to say we ran into a buzz saw. we were pushed back to the berm that surounded the village. do you remember when a duster (70 mm trk) took a rpg? it was sgt. ryan and myself that ran to the trk and pulled 3(?) wounded out, all the while the gooks were still trying to knock us out with rpg. we could hear them hissing overhead and we got the wounded out and moved to a tree grove about 75 yards back. that is when sgt ryan jumped into the trk and drove out of range (silver star for that ) all the while rpg hissing all over the place. the next day our sgt. ryan took it in the mouth.

let me tell yu about ryan. we had just come back to pho loi from the 1st contact with the gooks at an my village. we were back in the compound of the air base (pho loi), me and the sgt. were sitting in our little area and i looked over to ryan while he was writting to his wife and i said, "sgt., you look like you should be sitting in you big easy chair at home, smoking your pipe". he just grinned at me.

the next day during our sweep (the marine tactic we talked about eariler), we got on a scurmish line and began our sweep. the funny thing is about 2 guys in front of us looked in the same hole with incident. when it was my turn to walk past the hole, i too look in and saw nothing but darkness and kept walking. sgt. ryan was right behind me and when he looked in they opened up with a ak. i know they were waiting for someone with rank and since ryan looked older, he was chosen.

when i immediately got to him, i knew he had died, there was no way he could have survived the shots to the head. he was the platoons father and after his death, our platoon literally turned in the killing machine that the army wanted. we now had a real reason to go after the enemy.
his present changed the complex of the our platoon before and after his death. i'll never forget him.


the second battle you are talking about was the ambush of 'tu tuc', our company had pull point the day before and the next day we rotated back and charlie co. to took point. well, you know the rest charlie company took it in the ass and also mangled some of delta to boot. that was the second worst day for me.

** Note on above para. **
My platoon was the point Platoon for Delta Co., on the 1st day. Never seen the 2nd day – I was wounded 1st day. However, on the 2nd day one of my troops was gut shot pretty bad and we seen each other at 24th Med Evac and he looked at me and said “Sir – Your Dead!”
** end note **

i remember you very well and we got along very well, we both detestd carr. do you remember carr sendihng us out on a patrol with no back-up at all. we walking along a river (saigon) and we saw all kinds of sandals tracks all around us and we called it in,. your were very cool, told to eat our c's right at that location with all the gooks watching us from the hedgerows, your logic was to pretned we were bait for them to attack and that they knew we were bait, so they didn't attack. when we called it in carr basically said 'you are on your own'. he was mad at you for calling on him about his marine on line tactics at ‘an my’ and was trying to get you and your platoon killed. i think that was the maddest i've ever been at an officer.

right now my mind is flooding with memories and i have to stop, hope you understand, will talk at ya later

TO: Doc Torres:

By the way, after the battle at An My, I took 4 captured AK47's to an Air Cav unit and traded them for 4 M-60's (they happen to have a lot of them for door gunners). Being prior enlisted, I knew how to barter with supply sergeants and I needed more firepower in my Platoon. Capt Carr had a fit - I told him to shove it. Hmmmm another after thought during that battle, one of my men captured a fairly new motor scooter and tagged it as his war booty. We loaded the scooter onto one of the mech Cav APC's for them to haul it out. In order to get it back, after the battle was a done deal, I had to lock and load on the Cav's Company Commander and told him to go and get the friggin scooter.

We have to talk on the phone and maybe get together. Do you work? I'm retired - just waiting to die ROFLOL.

End if email stuff regarding this info
================================================== ==========================================
I have found two official write-ups on the web in regard to the battle at An My. One of those states it was a ONE day battle and provided very little detail. The other at least disclosed that it was a TWO day battle that included a write-up regarding Sgt Ryan. An extract of that so called “historical” document follows:

Tet
On 1 February, following the start of the Tet Offensive, C Company, 1-28 made contact outside of the village of An My less than a mile from the north gate of the 1st ID base camp at Phu Loi. C Company, facing strong VC resistance, was reinforced by D Company. Alpha Company would join the battle at noon.

Squad leader Staff Sergeant Bernard Ryan was wounded by an enemy grenade, but continued to fight. He killed an enemy machine gun team, then led a squad to secure a supporting tank that had been hit by an RPG. Staff Sergeant Ryan commandeered the tank and drove it to safety. He would receive an "impact award" Silver Star at the end of the day. The following day he was mortally wounded by a sniper while attempting to destroy a VC bunker. 1-28 ordered to break contact while artillery and air strikes pummeled An My all night.

On 2 February, 1-28, supported by three cavalry platoons swept from south to north on line. 1-28 met light resistance on the left and right, while C Company, in the middle met heavy enemy fire. 1-28 fought house to house in the village, completing its search at 1900. The enemy suffered 372 dead and 12 captured, and lost large quantities of supplies. 1-28 lost eighteen KIA and forty-nine WIA.

After participating in several more operations, 1-28 would finish the year at Fire Base Remagen.


KEN
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« Reply #20 on: October 13, 2007, 02:43:01 AM »

Due to the good eats, I gained about 15lbs during this boat trip. No worry – little did I know that I would lose these extra pounds, plus additional pounds, due yet to be experienced during combat operations.

Lower ranked officers on board ship, as I was, would be assigned as Duty Officer from time-to-time. This duty consisted of going below deck to the “Rat Hole” and check on the troops. Had to break up fights, investigate thefts and generally maintain some order below deck. Oh, since it was an official U.S. Navy ship, we had Marine Guards on board that would escort us around below deck. During the trip, a couple of troops did end up in the ship’s Brig.

Our travel was during a very nice summer normally found in July, and the Pacific Ocean was a vast reflective mirror with little to no waves (except the waves made by our ship). Even with this condition, many folks did get seasick. Couldn’t understand that – I thought it was a pleasant cruise. Learned and played a lot of Bridge, sun bathed out on deck, counted sea gulls, watch dolphins follow and jump around the ship, and periodically spot stuff floating in the ocean; like boots, fishing nets and whatever else may have been dumped into the sea. Most of the time it was very boring when all you seen from ship to the horizon was water, water, and more water.

We did have some exciting times also. We stopped overnight at Guam and went ashore. A lot of the folks really got wasted (both officers and enlisted). The so called gentleman Officers completely tore apart the Officer’s Club in Guam. When THEY boarded the ship the next day, they got their butts chewed out by the ship’s Captain, and all rooms were searched for a stupid wall painting that had disappeared. You know one of them “black velvet”, half naked, Polynesian hula girl wall pictures. Hehe – must have been a hellva party I missed out on!

We also passed through the straits of the Philippine Islands. WOW! Many, many Islands; took all day. As we passed these Islands, I thought of the Marines during WWII and how the fights must have been terrible.

Also, I remembered the torn and frayed flags I had seen in Navy history displays that were on the war ships during the battle of these Islands. It was creepy. As we traveled between these Islands, only a few miles apart, and if we were to put ourselves on a WWII Navy ship, when they were receiving fire from the Japanese on these Islands – WOW! WHAT A GUANTLET! HAD TO BE HELL!

Late afternoon on the 20th of July 1967, the ship personnel made an announcement that the shores we were looking at were the shores of Vietnam. Before nightfall, we were sailing south, laterally to, and about 10 or 20 miles off the shore. We could see floating dead bodies, hands tied behind their backs, some with no heads. As twilight came and darkness was setting in, we got a good view of night time combat taking place on land. All through the night you could see tracers going back and forth and air strikes being performed (bombs and explosions). This really set the stage for our coming events.

Needless to say, most of us didn’t get much sleep this night as we watched and wondered about our fate.

KEN
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« Reply #21 on: October 13, 2007, 02:50:39 AM »

Miss Saigon

Did this for you - some good pictures here of Vietnamese living conditions.
Village of AN MY was real pucker time on Feb 1st & 2nd 1968 for me and my 1st Div Platoon (D Co 1/28th)

1968 Village pictures of Phu Loi and An My are from: http://www.pbase.com/character/svietnam68

The following write-up was taken from: www.angelfire.com/biz/VIETNAMBOOKS/History.html

1st Division installation of Phu Loi.
Located approximately 30 kilometers northeast of Saigon, along National Route 13, Phu Loi was headquarters for the Big Red One’s Division Artillery, its armored cavalry unit (1st Sq./4th Cavalry), and other key division units. Team Wildcat 1 was led by SSgt Jack Liesure and comprized of Assistant Team Leader Roger Anderson, Charley Hartsoe and Chris Ferris. Team Wildcat 2 was led by Sgt. Ronnie Luse and comprised of Assistant Team Leader Robert Elsner, Bill Cohn, Al Coleman, Dave Hill, and John Mills. The LRRP teams would be operating under the command and control of Division Artillery HQ. Surrounded by vast rice paddies (dry at this time of the year), rubber trees and the villages that supported those agricultural activities, Phu Loi had been the scene of fierce fighting during the 1968 Tet offensive. Major units of North Vietnamese Army (NVA) and Viet Cong (VC) troops had used the area around Phu Loi for pre-Tet staging and as a jumping-off point for their attacks on Saigon and surrounding U.S. and South Vietnamese installations. Co. F (LRP) Team Wildcat 2, led by Sgt. Luse, had on January 31, 1968, spotted an estimated VC/NVA regiment attempting a night crossing north of Phu Loi from Dog Leg Village (named “Dog Leg” by the Americans, due to its “L” shaped appearance from the air) to An My, and conducted an artillery ambush against them, prematurely triggering the first Tet attacks against Phu Loi. After being nearly decimated by the artillery and air support called in by the LRRPs, the surviving enemy troops had escaped into the nearby village of An My, which itself became the scene of a vicious battle, as elements of the Division’s 1st Bn/28th Inf. and 1st Sq./4th Cavalry fought for the next few days to roust the communist force from the village. Ironically, Team 2 received credit only for spotting the enemy troops, the official “After Action Report” failing to mention that the LRRPs had actually remained in their ambush position and adjusted artillery and aerial fire on the NVA/VC force throughout the night of 31 January. The LRRPs withdrew to Phu Loi base camp only after the enemy had moved into An My.


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KEN
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« Reply #22 on: August 17, 2012, 08:30:35 PM »




Rest in Peace Ken
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« Last Edit: August 17, 2012, 08:34:45 PM by Huyen » Logged
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« Reply #23 on: August 19, 2012, 03:46:15 PM »

Rest in Peace Ken
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