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Author Topic: Fourth of July  (Read 8413 times)
RadioResearcher
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« on: July 03, 2007, 08:04:45 PM »

Happy Fourth of July to All Vietnam War Vets ! [ IMAGE NOT SHOWN - GUESTS CANNOT VIEW ATTACHED IMAGES ]
« Last Edit: July 03, 2007, 08:09:06 PM by RadioResearcher » Logged

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Chu Lai, RVN, 1967-1968
cwo7141
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« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2007, 09:23:17 PM »

[ IMAGE NOT SHOWN - GUESTS CANNOT VIEW ATTACHED IMAGES ]
Follow this link to view those sailors who were awarded the Navy Cross during the Viet Nam War.

Note the 25 Navy Hospital Corpman, 19 Posthumously.

The Navy Cross is the second highest medal that can be awarded by the Department of the Navy and the second highest award given for valor. It is normally only awarded to members of the United States Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard but could be awarded to all branches of United States military. During the VN era one US Army pilot and two Army of The Republic of Viet Nam enlisted men were award the Navy Cross.

They are not forgotten!
« Last Edit: July 06, 2007, 09:56:15 PM by cwo7141 » Logged

Very Respectfully,
Swab Jocky, U.S. Navy 1971-1999
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Huyen
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« Reply #2 on: July 06, 2007, 11:06:36 PM »

[ IMAGE NOT SHOWN - GUESTS CANNOT VIEW ATTACHED IMAGES ]
Follow this link to view those sailors who were awarded the Navy Cross during the Viet Nam War.

Note the 25 Navy Hospital Corpman, 19 Posthumously.

I have read two books on the MoH given in Vietnam, but never anything on the Navy Cross, although I am familiar with it because I have met a two time winner and saw his two crosses, among his other medals.  This Marine is the one who got me started reading about the Vietnam war in the first place.  It is not surprising that there were 25 corpsmen on the list as they operated in the field with the Marines.  I have read three of Doc Bruce Norton's books.  He was a corpsman with Force Recon in Vietnam.   

I learned something while looking over the list though.  I noticed that someone got one during the Vietnam war while serving in the Mediterranean.  This surprised me so I looked it up to find out what that was about.  It was the USS Liberty incident.  An American ship was accidentally attacked by Israeli planes during the Six day war in 1967.   So I learned something.  Interesting link. 

-H
« Last Edit: July 06, 2007, 11:22:18 PM by Huyen » Logged
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« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2007, 11:33:40 PM »

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On that June day in 1967, the weather was beautiful... Clear and sunny, visibility unlimited... the LIBERTY, an elaborate state-of-the art intelligence gathering platform, was in international waters off the Gaza strip and was flying the Stars and Stripes. Israeli reconnaissance planes flew overhead for hours. Pilots and ship's crew waved to each other. Then, inexplicably, unmarked Israeli aircraft began attacking the ship. REF: http://home.cfl.rr.com/gidusko/liberty/

I was stationed with a Chief Petty Officer in 1983 who was a young deck seaman on the Liberty in 1967, and it was NO accident, in fact he had prepared presenation of his story which he told on the ship's closed circuit TV, he said he was dedicated to getting the truth out. Why the Israeli's did it is being debated to this day.

Huyen,

I also saw the one NC for the Mediterranean but did not research it, glad you did and told us.

Read Admiral Thomas H. Moorer's report from 1968.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2007, 11:48:10 PM by cwo7141 » Logged

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« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2007, 10:24:06 AM »

Why the Israeli's did it is being debated to this day.

Yes.  I read about the controversy.  I must admit, it seems illogical to me.  I can think of absolutely nothing Israel could hope to gain by such an action. On the other hand I can think of a whole lot of things they could lose. 

-H
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« Reply #5 on: July 03, 2008, 09:18:18 AM »

A Fourth of July Message from the National Army Security Agency Association


"Puff the Magic Dragon" near Nha Trang, 1968
Thanks to Clyde "Rowdy" Yates, 313th RR Bn

NASAA Independence Day Message—2008
Charles H. Collins, Jr., NASAA Board of Directors


On this upcoming Independence Day, 232 years after that fateful, worthy day in 1776, we often find it easy to overlook the courage and conviction of our founding fathers.

Today, most people won't even put their jobs at risk, let alone their lives. By all rights, those people should be humiliated and ashamed when they consider the courage of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. What happened to those courageous men after they pledged to risk all for freedom? Our founders understood that they were indeed pledging "to each other, our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor." These were people with much to lose, and many did. The 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence were patriots, important in the affairs of their local communities and governments. Ages ranged from 26 (Rutledge) to 70 (Franklin). They were, for the most part, prosperous. Nine were wealthy farmers or landowners and 24 were lawyers or judges.

Their ranks included the colonies' most respected doctors, educators, and clergymen; elite but not elitists. They had much to lose—life, liberty, and property—but they knew the cause justified the risk. While they signed that fateful document, the British fleet, dozens of ships with 42,000 sailors and soldiers, was off the coast waiting to crush the patriots. Behind that fleet were the wealth and power of the British Empire. Arrayed against this might was an army of 10,000 men and a few poorly equipped and untrained militias. Few who knew history would have predicted anything but failure for the colonial forces in 1776.

Disaster and ruin was the lot for many signers. Nine died of wounds or hardships during the war. Five were jailed and tortured. One lost all 13 children; the wives, sons, and daughters of others were killed, imprisoned, harassed, and deprived of their possessions. Seventeen signers lost everything. All were hunted down as traitors and most were separated from homes and families.

Please note: No signer ever betrayed his pledged word. There were no defectors. No one changed his mind. Many lost lives and fortunes, but none sacrificed sacred honor. Half continued to serve the country after the war—several as President, many as members of Congress, governors, and state legislators. Many went on to write the Constitution of the United States.

Now, what about today? Where do the decent people who should be standing up and taking action against evil hide? Do they care enough to speak up, let alone risk something for their convictions.

If they don't care, then I don't care about them. If they are afraid, well, that's too bad. My father was afraid when he waded ashore at Normandy, when he fought in the Battle of the Bulge, and when he lay dying of cancer when I was seven and my brother was four—knowing he wouldn't see his sons grow up. He put principles and duty above personal safety and did the right thing despite the fear. Sometimes there's something more important than living a few more days; I pity those who don't know that and who live in the shadows, paralyzed by fear and unwilling to bet it all on what they know is right. They are but empty shells who will never know their potential greatness.

Let us, today, remember the words of Thomas Paine in The Crisis: "These are the times that try men's souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph."

I don't suggest we can hope to measure up to those giants. But is it possible that, by recognizing their greatness and calling on our inner strength and dedication and with the help of God, each of us can aspire to bask for a moment or two in that light.
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